Support 911Blogger


Excerpt from "They Thought They Were Free," Germans 1933-1945

Just ran across this book last night, "They Thought They Were Free," and posted an excerpt from chapter 13, "But then it was too late," on my blog. The book chronicles the slow descent into fascism that occurred in Germany 1933-1945. It contains such chilling pasages as:

"To live in this process is absolutely not to be able to notice it—please try to believe me—unless one has a much greater degree of political awareness, acuity, than most of us had ever had occasion to develop. Each step was so small, so inconsequential, so well explained or, on occasion, ‘regretted,’ that, unless one were detached from the whole process from the beginning, unless one understood what the whole thing was in principle, what all these ‘little measures’ that no ‘patriotic German’ could resent must some day lead to, one no more saw it developing from day to day than a farmer in his field sees the corn growing. One day it is over his head.

"How is this to be avoided, among ordinary men, even highly educated ordinary men? Frankly, I do not know. I do not see, even now. Many, many times since it all happened I have pondered that pair of great maxims, Principiis obsta and Finem respice—‘Resist the beginnings’ and ‘Consider the end.’ But one must foresee the end in order to resist, or even see, the beginnings. One must foresee the end clearly and certainly and how is this to be done, by ordinary men or even by extraordinary men?"

http://www.sheilacasey.com/2008/05/excerpt-from-they-thought-they-were-free-about-germanys-decline-into-fascism.html

AttachmentSize
fascism.jpg31.57 KB

The parallels are amazing

"Your friend the baker was right," said my colleague. "The dictatorship, and the whole process of its coming into being, was above all diverting. It provided an excuse not to think for people who did not want to think anyway. I do not speak of your ‘little men,’ your baker and so on; I speak of my colleagues and myself, learned men, mind you. Most of us did not want to think about fundamental things and never had. There was no need to. Nazism gave us some dreadful, fundamental things to think about—we were decent people—and kept us so busy with continuous changes and ‘crises’ and so fascinated, yes, fascinated, by the machinations of the ‘national enemies,’ without and within, that we had no time to think about these dreadful things that were growing, little by little, all around us. Unconsciously, I suppose, we were grateful. Who wants to think?

And here is one more little step in the process

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080524/ap_on_re_us/stealth_helicopter

all in the name of 9/11. Every time I see something like this I want to scream.