Military Coup In Honduras Led By "School Of The Americas (SOA) Graduate"

(Also see analysis at Narconews.com. -rep.)

http://www.soaw.org/

A military coup has taken place in Honduras this morning (Sunday, June 28), led by School of the Americas (SOA) graduate Romeo Vasquez. In the early hours of the day, members of the Honduran military surrounded the presidential palace and forced the democratically elected president, Manuel Zelaya, into custody. He was immediately flown to Costa Rica.

The Honduran state television was taken off the air. The electricity supply to the capital Tegucigalpa, as well telephone and cellphone lines were cut. The people of Honduras are going into the streets. From Costa Rica, President Zelaya has called for a non-violent response from the people of Honduras, and for international solidarity for the Honduran democracy.

Would pause before

using the word "coup". Found this quote:

"This is a legal removal of a president that is in violation of the Honduran Constitution.
This was not a coup. Zelaya was legally removed by the military at the request of the Honduran Congress and the Honduran Supreme Court that have the following two articles of the Honduran Constitution as the legal authority to do so; ARTICULO 239.- declares that any president that seeks to invalidate the Honduran Constitution in an effort to stay in office shall be removed immediately and not be eligible for office for 10 years. And ARTICULO 205.- which states that Congress has the power to investigate and remove said president at their leisure."

________________________
“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world today -- my own government.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.
http://www.mikeruppert.blogspot.com
http://www.ubuntu.com
Dont preach it, just mention it :)

legally removed?

WTF..theres no such thing...esp as he was then removed from the counrty///
'
What he admits was illegal was the act of shipping Zelaya to a foreign country in the dead of night rather than detaining him to stand trial.'
http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2009/7/3/749494/-Top-Honduran-Officer:...

Its a coup, complete with media blackout:

Zombie,

Can you give us a source for that quote and do you now stand behind it?

Sorry

I was at work at the time I posted it and do not have the source. I dont "stand behind it", but was just pointing it out for the sake of discourse. I certainly wouldn't put it past this administration to have some sort of connection to the removal of a democratically elected leader. Not like it hasn't happened before, over and over.

________________________
“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world today -- my own government.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.
http://www.mikeruppert.blogspot.com
http://www.ubuntu.com
Dont preach it, just mention it :)

found this morning

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/29/world/americas/29honduras.html?_r=2&pa...

________________________
“The greatest purveyor of violence in the world today -- my own government.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.
http://www.mikeruppert.blogspot.com
http://www.ubuntu.com
Dont preach it, just mention it :)

Top Honduran Officer: Taking Zelaya out of the country was illeg

Top Honduran Officer: Taking Zelaya out of the country was illegal
by Lost Left Coaster
Share this on Twitter - Top Honduran Officer: Taking Zelaya out of the country was illegal Fri Jul 03, 2009 at 07:10:09 AM PDT
Maybe thiswill finally shut the "it wasn't a coup, it was a constitutional action" apologists up. From today's edition of the Miami Herald:

TEGUCIGALPA -- The military officers who rushed deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya out of the country Sunday committed a crime but will be exonerated for saving the country from mob violence, the army's top lawyer said.

In an interview with The Miami Herald and El Salvador's elfaro.net, army attorney Col. Herberth Bayardo Inestroza acknowledged that top military brass made the call to forcibly remove Zelaya -- and they circumvented laws when they did it.

More below the fold.

Lost Left Coaster's diary :: ::
So, here you have the top lawyer for the nation's armed forces admitting that what happened on June 28th was illegal. And then he uses the classic defense that this extrajudicial coup was necessary to avoid violence -- sometimes that pesky constitution just doesn't cut it, I guess:

''What was more beneficial, remove this gentleman from Honduras or present him to prosecutors and have a mob assault and burn and destroy and for us to have to shoot?'' he said. ``If we had left him here, right now we would be burying a pile of people.''

So, he says, if Zelaya had been taken into custody and imprisoned in Honduras, there would have been mob violence demanding Zelaya's reinstatement. While I don't discount that possibility, nevertheless it seems like a stretch to justify moving the entire operation from one of arresting a president who was allegedly performing an illegal action (in this case, holding a referendum on whether or not the nation should later hold a vote to change the constitution) and engaging in an action that Latin American countries have seen too many times: deposing a democratically elected president with military force and sending him packing. As we well know here in the United States, the constitution and its provisions cannot just be dumped aside in times of crisis. And the fact is, Zelaya's alleged offense was simply not egregious enough to justify the crime that the military's top lawyer now admits was committed.

Just to be clear that I am not misrepresenting the words of Col. Inestroza in the Miami Herald article: he does not call Zelaya's removal a coup, and he insists that the act of removing the president was lawful. What he admits was illegal was the act of shipping Zelaya to a foreign country in the dead of night rather than detaining him to stand trial.

History will not exonerate this strike against democracy in Honduras. This struggle between the military and the president should have been settled without resorting to actions that this military officer has now admitted were illegal.

Lest anyone forget that the military has its own political interests at stake:

Inestroza acknowledged that after 34 years in the military, he and many other longtime soldiers found Zelaya's allegiance to Chávez difficult to stomach. Although he calls Zelaya a ''leftist of lies'' for his bourgeoisie upbringing, he admits he'd have a hard time taking orders from a leftist.

...

''We fought the subversive movements here and we were the only country that did not have a fratricidal war like the others,'' he said. ``It would be difficult for us, with our training, to have a relationship with a leftist government. That's impossible. I personally would have retired, because my thinking, my principles, would not have allowed me to participate in that.''

So there you go Honduras. The military says that you may have any government you'd like, as long as it isn't leftist.

UPDATE (10:32 am EDT): Sorry about the poll. I should have known better than to try and use properly accented characters for the Spanish words! I guess everyone can figure it out. The messed up words are, of course, Si and Pie de Limon.
http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2009/7/3/749494/-Top-Honduran-Officer:...