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Staged Terror, Fukushima Crime Syndicate, Conspiracy Reality

On this episode of Breaking the Set, Abby Martin talks to NYU professor and author of 'Fooled Again', Mark Crispin Miller about voting fraud, 911 and how the term 'Conspiracy Theory' shuts down objective debates. Abby then speaks with Kurt Haskell, Congressional Candidate for Michigan's 7th District, about his experience on the flight with the Christmas day Underwear Bomber that completely contradicts the government's narrative. BTS wraps up the show with a look at the intertwined relationship between the Japanese Yakuza crime syndicate and the nuclear energy industry in Japan.

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More information.

Here are links to the declassified memo CIA Instructions to Media Assets.

Important parts of the memo

Scanned document - http://www.maryferrell.org/mffweb/archive/viewer/showDoc.do?docId=3167&relPageId=1

Kevin Ryan has checked the archives of the Washington Post and NYT if the instructions of this memo might have effected the reporting style of these newspapers. Here is what he found:

This cultural phenomenon goes back to 1967. At that time, in response to questions about the Warren Commission Report (which President Ford helped create), the CIA issued a memorandum calling for mainstream media sources to begin countering “conspiracy theorists.”[13]

In the 45 years before the CIA memo came out, the phrase “conspiracy theory” appeared in the Washington Post and New York Times only 50 times, or about once per year. In the 45 years after the CIA memo, the phrase appeared 2,630 times, or about once per week.

Before the CIA memo came out, the Washington Post and New York Times had never used the phrase “conspiracy theorist.” After the CIA memo came out, these two newspapers have used that phrase 1,118 times. Of course, in these uses the phrase is always delivered in a context in which “conspiracy theorists” were made to seem less intelligent and less rationale than people who uncritically accept official explanations for major events.

President George W. Bush and his colleagues often used the phrase conspiracy theory in attempts to deter questioning about their activities. When questioned by reporters about an emerging scandal in September 2000, Bush said the idea that his presidential campaign was flashing subliminal messages in advertisements was absurd, and he added that “conspiracy theories abound in America’s politics.”[14] When in 1994, Bush’s former company Harken Energy was linked to the fraudulent Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) through several investors, Bush’s spokeswoman, Karen Hughes, shut down the inquiry by telling the Associated Press — “We have no response to silly conspiracy theories.”

http://digwithin.net/2012/05/30/another-911-conspiracy/

Source

kevin ryan's quotes

am i misconstruing, or do the second and third paragraphs you quote contradict each other/not match?? thanks for reminding us of this excellent work.

Clarification?

The paragraphs you refer to mention both terms 'conspiracy theory' and 'conspiracy theorist', treat them as distinct from one another, and the stats are different for both. Might it be that you thought they concerned only one of these phrases?