Alexander Dewdney

A Forensic Analysis of September 11th, 2001: Questioning the Official Story - Video

Alexander Dewdney and Graeme MacQueen speak at University of Waterloo, on March 19, 2008. Approximately 400 people filled Hagey Hall and both speakers received roaring applause for their lectures.

"The Record" Prints Fair Article for Kitchener-Waterloo 9/11 Event

9/11 theories subject of debate
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March 13, 2008
Tamsin McMahon
RECORD STAFF

WATERLOO

There was a time not long ago when holding a debate about the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was taboo, even among university students.

But nearly seven years after two planes felled the World Trade Center towers in New York, the University of Waterloo debating society is opening the door on the issue in a discussion next Wednesday.

While there now seems to be no shortage of scholars trying to debunk the U.S. government's conclusions about Sept. 11, debate organizers struggled to find someone willing to defend the official version of events contained in U.S. 9/11 Commission Report.

Students had hoped representatives from Popular Mechanics magazine would defend the government position, since the magazine issued a report challenging some Sept. 11 conspiracy theories. But the group couldn't afford the honorarium, said Adnan Zuberi, public relations manager of the debating society and a third-year math and physics student.

A Forensic Analysis of September 11, 2001: Questioning the Official Story - Waterloo, Ontario

A Forensic Analysis of September 11, 2001: Questioning the Official Story

Canadian academics A.K.Dewdney and Graeme MacQueen will be lecturing on the subject of 9/11 at the University of Waterloo. This is a free event organized by the University of Waterloo Debating Society and by Adnan Zuberi and Adam Parrott. Lectures will be followed by refreshments.

Wednesday, March 19, 2008
Humanities Theatre, J.G. Hagey Hall
University of Waterloo
6:30 - 9pm

A.K.Dewdney is a Canadian mathematician, computer scientist, and philosopher who has written a number of books on the future and implications of modern computing. Dewdney holds the position of Professor Emeritus of the University of Western Ontario. Dewdney authored Scientific American's recreational mathematics column from 1984 to 1993. He has developed hypotheses which sharply disagree with the official version of the events surrounding the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.