Centers for Disease Control

Can the "Mexican flu" be traced to the Centers for Disease Control?

Can the "Mexican flu" be traced to the Centers for Disease Control?

By Peter Duveen

PETER'S NEW YORK, Saturday, May 2, 2009--The strain of flu that allegedly began circulating in Mexico in March and April and that has appeared in other countries since, including the United States, may have emerged from research at the U.S Centers for Disease Control. This flu has been mistakenly referred to as "swine flu." While its composition contains elements of "swine flu," it has not been shown to infect swine. This article will refer to the new strain of flu as the "Mexican flu," after the country whose capital, Mexico City, has been virtually shut down as a result of its presence there.

McClatchy Newspapers tells us the following about it:

"Q. What makes this swine flu (sic) virus special?

"A: It's a novel combination of bird, pig and human viral genes never before found in the U.S. or elsewhere, so people have no immunity to it. It's a descendant of the H1N1 virus that killed tens of millions of people worldwide in the pandemic of 1918-1919, mixed in with recent strains of swine and bird flu viruses."