DEPRESSION

First Iceland, then the World

Michael Collins

The public is angry. Why should the public pay for the bankers mistakes. Iceland blogger Halldor Sigurdsson

Who cleans up the mess when ignorant, greedy bankers rack up massive debt then go broke? The people of Iceland made a strong statement Saturday. The sins of big bankers and government regulators shouldn't fall on the citizens. By a 93% to 2% margin, they voted down a proposal requiring them to cover bad debt incurred by one of the nation’s oldest and largest banks. Covering the debt would have cost Iceland's 317,000 citizens around $17,000 each.

Kids Who Lost Parent On 9/11 Suffer

Source: http://www.nypress.com/blogx/display_blog.cfm?bid=69834276

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Kids Who Lost Parent On 9/11 Suffer

A study released yesterday showed that three-quarters of children who lost a parent on 9/11 suffered from psychiatric illnesses after the attacks, including anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress and depression. Shocking, I know. Researchers at New York Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center monitored 45 kids (average age of nine) who had lost a parent for two years following the attacks. Before 9/11, only one-third of them had mental health problems. They were compared to 34 children who had not lost a parent, and the number of psychiatric problems suffered by the former group more than doubled after the attacks. Findings also revealed that children who lost a parent are 10 times as likely to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder than those who did not.

Bereaved Children of 9/11 Victims Suffered High Rates of Psychiatric Illness

Source: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/528209/?sc=rsmn

Source: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College

Released: Mon 19-Mar-2007, 16:00 ET

Bereaved Children of 9/11 Victims Suffered High Rates of Psychiatric Illness

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Keywords
DR. CYNTHIA PFEFFER, DR. MARGARET ALTEMUS, PSYCHIATRY, ANXIETY DISORDER, POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, PTSD, SEPT. 11, BEREAVEMENT, DEPRESSION

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The rate of psychiatric illness among children who lost a parent in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center attack doubled -- from about 32 to nearly 73 percent -- in the years following the event, according to a new study from researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Newswise — The rate of psychiatric illness among children who lost a parent in the Sept. 11, 2001, World Trade Center attack doubled -- from about 32 to nearly 73 percent -- in the years following the event, according to a new study from researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.