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A dozen 9/11 health cases, chosen out of 10,000 lawsuits filed, will go to trial starting in May

NY DAILY NEWS: A dozen 9/11 health cases, chosen out of 10,000 lawsuits filed, will go to trial starting in May

BY Alison Gendar
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Saturday, February 20th 2010, 4:00 AM

Nearly a decade after the Twin Towers fell, a dozen of those who claim they've been condemned to death by Ground Zero's toxins are finally headed to court.

Federal Judge Alvin Hellerstein Friday revealed the 12 health cases tied to the terror attacks that will go to trial in Manhattan federal court just blocks from the World Trade Center site.

"These cases include some who have spent the greatest amount of time searching for remains, cleaning up," said Paul Napoli, a lead lawyer for many of the plaintiffs. "They are among the greatest heroes and they bear the brunt of illness because of those efforts."

The dozen cases are a mix of New York City firefighters, cops, transit workers and Con Ed employees.

Kucinich Promises Hearing on 9/11 Health; Responders 'Money Bomb' Raises Thousands

Kucinich Promises Hearing on 9/11 Health; Responders 'Money Bomb' Raises Thousands

Aaron Dykes / JonesReport.com | February 18, 2008

http://wearechange.org/

http://www.jonesreport.com/article/02_08/170208_responders.html

Congressman Dennis Kucinich promised a group of first responders that he would work towards a hearing on 9/11 health that would start from sworn statements and other compiled information about the health conditions of rescue workers suffering from ground zero exposure.

"This might take awhile, but we need to start gathering information," Kucinich said. "If you'll work with me to build the hearings, I'll commit to one major hearing that will focus on all the concerns that you have."

It was determined 9/11 first responders who brought about the meeting. David Miller, a ground zero worker and former national guardsman now suffering from mesothelioma, pressured Rep. Kucinich to hear his case and those of dozens of other rescue workers. According to Kucinich, Miller convinced him the meeting was necessary.