Globe And Mail

Was 9/11 a conspiracy? 'Truthers' make their case

As of this moment that I'm typing this, there are no comments in the feedback section. In particular, we should respond to what I feel is the most egregious statement in the article: "As probably should be expected with any conspiracy theorizing, the Truthers' side strains the boundaries of credibility."

Interestingly, the article concedes that the movement is "gaining steam," much to the chagrin of our anti-truth opposition which loves to claim that the movement has been losing steam since the 5th anniversary.
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Was 9/11 a conspiracy? ‘Truthers' make their case

CBC's fifth estate airs The Unofficial Story

Andrew Ryan

Published on Thursday, Nov. 26, 2009 5:47PM EST

Watching the amateur video evidence of 9/11 has not gotten easier with time.

Patriot Act haunts Google service

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080324.wrgoogle24/BNStory/Technology/home

SIMON AVERY

From Monday's Globe and Mail

March 24, 2008 at 4:05 AM EDT

Google Inc. is a year into its ground-shifting strategy to change the way people communicate and work.

But the initiative to reinvent the way that people use software is running headlong into another new phenomenon of the information technology age: the unprecedented powers of security officials in the United States to conduct surveillance on communications.

Eighteen months ago, Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., had an outdated computer system that was crashing daily and in desperate need of an overhaul. A new installation would have cost more than $1-million and taken months to implement. Google's service, however, took just 30 days to set up, didn't cost the university a penny and gave nearly 8,000 students and faculty leading-edge software, said Michael Pawlowski, Lakehead's vice-president of administration and finance.

U.S.-based Google spotlighted the university as one of the first to adopt its software model of the future, and today Mr. Pawlowski boasts the move was the right thing for Lakehead, saving it hundreds of thousands of dollars in annual operating costs. But he notes one trade-off: The faculty was told not to transmit any private data over the system, including student marks.

Globe and Mail "reviews" Towers of Deception

Martin Levin, writing in the Books section of the Globe and Mail yesterday (page D13), trashes Towers of Deception and says some of the "more important" books on 9/11 will be "reviewed at length" in coming weeks.

Levin misrepresents Zwicker's argument, claiming, for example, that Zwicker says Noam Chomsky "is part of the plot," without explaining what he means by that. Levin writes:

"Now I have little trouble believing it possible that plutocrats of the Bush-Cheney-Rumsfeld axis of ego are orchestrating things for their own benefit and that of their Fortune 500 cronies. Or that the war in Iraq is based on an unsavoury stew of misconceptions, stupidity, wishful thinking and deceit. But what I do have difficulty believing is that the 'perpetrators' are intelligent enough and, I suppose, quite evil enough, not only to concoct such a grand strategy, but to carry it off so deviously that only Zwicker and his allies can discern its true nature. I have just as hard a time believing that this sometimes entertainingly obsessive screed has proved anything at all."

"Only Zwicker and his allies"? You mean the 100 million Americans, 20 million Canadians, and countless millions of foreigners who believe the US government did it?