Khalid Sheikh Mohammad

9/11 'paymaster' back in court, may be cleared of Pearl's death

9/11 'paymaster' back in court, may be cleared of Pearl's death
The American Monitor
Devlin Buckley, 12/14/06

After four and a half years of delays, a Pakistani court has once again resumed hearing the appeals of four men convicted for the kidnap and murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl.

In 2002, the 9/11 ‘paymaster,’ Omar Sheikh, was sentenced to death for Pearl’s execution, while three others were sentenced to life in prison.

Omar, a suspected CIA asset who reportedly wired at least $100,000 to Mohammed Atta prior to 9/11, has never been charged for his alleged role in the terrorist attacks but has become infamous for his role in the Pearl case...

Pakistan, the CIA, and the 9/11 Paymaster

New article available at From The Wilderness regarding the alleged 9/11 'paymaster', Omar Sheikh, and his affiliations to Pakistani and Western intelligence agencies. FTW has made this article available to all nonsubscribers at my request. Short excerpt:

"...This suggests Pakistan is not only guilty of complicity in the 9/11 attacks, but is directly responsible for financing and coordinating the operation, which may explain why Musharraf chose to omit such pertinent information from his new book.

Moreover, there are several members of Musharraf’s own government, according to The Pittsburgh Tribune, who believe Omar Sheikh’s true power “comes not from the ISI, but from his connections with our own CIA.”21

Given Omar’s reported history, this certainly seems like a plausible explanation; and if true, it would establish a significant degree of U.S. government culpability for the 9/11 attacks. ..."

U.S. May Charge Alleged 9/11 Leader With The Death Of Daniel Pearl

Source: ledger-enquirer.com

By Carol Rosenberg
McClatchy Newspapers

U.S. military officials intend to charge Guantanamo Bay captive Khalid Sheikh Mohammed with the murder of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, according to a Time magazine report.

U.S. officials have identified Mohammed as the al Qaida mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and President Bush has said he's a likely candidate for a war-crimes trial.

But the Pentagon's chief war-crimes prosecutor told The Miami Herald on Friday that the Time report may be premature; prosecutors are still studying the case files of Mohammed and 13 other so-called high-value detainees who were turned over to the military by the CIA.

Captured in Pakistan in March 2003, Mohammed had been held in secret CIA detention until his Labor Day transfer to the Guantanamo detention center at the U.S. Navy base in southeast Cuba.