Mark Rossini

Alec Station, Footnote 44 And 9/11

An instance where we need further investigation, and have names of individuals that should have been held accountable, but weren’t.

Who is Rich Blee?

Today, Secrecy Kills.com released part 1 of their audio documentary, 'Who Is Rich Blee?'

The podcast can be found at the Secrecy Kills website.

The investigative work was originally to be released on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, but the creators of the documentary were threatened with federal prosecution by the CIA because they had unearthed the names of two CIA agents involved in the withholding of key information from the FBI and Whitehouse.

Ray Nowosielski and John Duffy released a statement in response to the CIA threat that is also available on their website.

[This is an outstanding piece of journalism that has taken Ray and John several years to bring to us. The work of people like Paul Thompson and Kevin Fenton has been a tremendous help to the 9/11 truth, justice, and accountability movement for many years now. I urge everyone that is interested in the truth of 9/11 to disseminate this as widely as you can. Part 2 will become available on October 11, 2011. -zbh]

Mixed Reaction to James Bamford’s Spy Factory – Precious Truths Surrounded by a Body of Secrets

I just watched PBS Nova’s Spy Factory with James Bamford and I have a number of comments about it, both good and bad.

Starting off with the good, having been writing about al-Qaeda’s communications hub in Yemen for the last two years, I was thrilled to actually see it on the screen. Bamford actually went to Yemen and filmed it from the outside, shame he didn’t go in.

(snip)

The first and most glaring omission is Alec Station deputy chief Tom Wilshire, who was not mentioned at all in the programme. It went into some detail about the blocking of the cable written by Doug Miller, an FBI detailee to Alec Station, to FBI headquarters about Almihdhar’s US visa, but this was attributed merely to the CIA officer we refer to as “Michelle.” Wilshire was her boss, she blocked the cable on his orders, and Bamford knows this well—he wrote it in the book this programme was based on.

Alec Station Blocked Cable to FBI about Almihdhar – Additions to the 9/11 Timeline as of January 25, 2009

Most of this week's new entries in the 9/11 Timeline are about one of the best-known pre-9/11 failures. After tracking alleged Pentagon hijacker Khalid Almihdhar from Yemen to Dubai in January 2000, the CIA learned he had a US visa. An FBI agent named Doug Miller on loan to Alec Station, the CIA's bin Laden unit, drafted a cable to the bureau warning them of the visa, and that Almihdhar would soon probably arrive in the US. However, another Alec Station officer, known only as "Michelle," said their boss, Deputy Station Chief Tom Wilshire, did not want the cable to be sent. Michelle then sent out a cable falsely stating that the information about Almihdhar's visa had been passed to the FBI. Miller complained to Mark Rossini, a fellow FBI agent on loan to Alec Station, and Rossini went to see Michelle, who told him the FBI would not be told of Almihdhar's visa because she knew the next al-Qaeda attack was going to be in Southeast Asia.