Michael Scheuer

NSA Deputy Director: What Al-Qaeda Meeting?

The most senior NSA official interviewed by the 9/11 Commission with a memo of interview in the recently released batch is undoubtedly Barbara McNamara. She joined the agency in 1963 and held a series of senior management positions, culminating in being deputy director from 1997 to 2000, before being put out to pasture as the NSA’s representative to London.

This is quite the most remarkable passage of the memo:

She does not recall being personally [asked] to provide about transcripts or raw data for [counterterrorism]. NSA has analysts posted across the community. But sharing of raw data is not done routinely by NSA unless they get a specific request for a specific item. She said that she does not remember people asking for raw data, but if they wanted it NSA would have provided it, particularly if they were called by the [CIA Director] or [Deputy CIA Director] or [Assistant CIA Director for Collection].

Mixed Reaction to James Bamford’s Spy Factory – Precious Truths Surrounded by a Body of Secrets

I just watched PBS Nova’s Spy Factory with James Bamford and I have a number of comments about it, both good and bad.

Starting off with the good, having been writing about al-Qaeda’s communications hub in Yemen for the last two years, I was thrilled to actually see it on the screen. Bamford actually went to Yemen and filmed it from the outside, shame he didn’t go in.

(snip)

The first and most glaring omission is Alec Station deputy chief Tom Wilshire, who was not mentioned at all in the programme. It went into some detail about the blocking of the cable written by Doug Miller, an FBI detailee to Alec Station, to FBI headquarters about Almihdhar’s US visa, but this was attributed merely to the CIA officer we refer to as “Michelle.” Wilshire was her boss, she blocked the cable on his orders, and Bamford knows this well—he wrote it in the book this programme was based on.

WeAreChangeLA schools Philip Shenon on Michael Scheuer, Mossad and the meaning of evidence when it comes to "incompetence"

On April 27, 2008, Philip Shenon, former investigative journalist at the New York Times and author of "The Commission: The Uncensored History of the 9-11 Commission" spoke on a panel at the LA Times Book Fair titled "Checks and Balances." Jeremy Rothe-Kushel of WeAreChangeLA asked him a question regarding how best to resolve the treasonous condition of the ongoing 9-11 cover-up. that video which has been posted here on 911blogger before is located here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuTpV5gSMsI&feature=related
After the panel, instead of signing books, he came to speak with a group of us 9-11 truth folks. Here is some of what happened:

Conversations with the Bin Laden Boys #1: Michael Scheuer on his homeboy OBL's videos, the Will to Kill and the 9-11 cover-up

Michael Scheuer is, as far as I know, the only Company Man to get a shout out from Osama Bin Laden, the big bad boogeyman that keeps on giving. So he was the right guy to clear up the confusion about the Bin Laden 9-11 "confession" video and his initial statements denying responsibility for the attacks. Garko and I went to the Hammer Museum in West Los Angeles a few weeks ago to check in with Bin Laden's (version fall '07) favorite former CIA man. If I had studied the great info that Reprehensor had sent me about the KLA/Al-Qaeda/NATO/CIA linkages better I would have gone further down that route to press Scheuer.

Former CIA honcho calls the 9-11 Commission "disastrous"

Former CIA honcho calls the 9-11 Commission "disastrous"

By Peter Duveen

PETER'S NEW YORK, April 21, 2008--The 9-11 Commission completed its report in 2004, but not everybody was on board with the results. Not least among its critics is Michael Scheuer, former head of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency's bin Laden unit, who is now a news commentator and author.

"Of course, the 9-11 Commission was a disastrous thing for America," Scheuer said in a recent televised appearance. Scheuer was interviewing another author, Steve Coll, whose book, The Bin Ladens, on the wealthy Saudi family, was released April 1.

The interview, part of a series of programs called After Words and televised on the cable news network C-SPAN, dredged through both men's experience in dealing with and covering the bin Laden family. Scheuer headed up the CIA's bin Laden unit from 1996 to 1999.

During an exchange of views, Scheuer remarked that he was astounded by how much access the family had to the White House over the years. "I think it's a very interesting comment on the power of money," Scheuer said. "For Americans, it's got to be a very disturbing story."