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Revisiting 9/11 by John Kusumi

Article by John Kusumi at COTO Report, commenting on our recent successes, and presenting his take on unanswered questions..

Even harsh critics of the 9/11 truth movement should admit that it’s gaining lately.

An ancient Chinese curse says, “May you live in interesting times.” In their college years, Baby Boomers reacted to the Vietnam war. The Civil Rights movement; high profile political assassinations; and Watergate also made a big impression. In my GenX college years, we reacted to President Reagan; Tiananmen Square; watched the Cold War end; and noted the first Gulf War as the U.S. military kicked the forces of Saddam Hussein out of Kuwait.

Some number of people in Generation Y (the Millenials, who are now 28 and younger) can say, “I went to college, and what I learned was that 9/11 was an inside job.” Several influences are contending for the attention of that generation: the 9/11 Truth movement; the pro-Constitution and end-the-Fed movements (call it the Ron Paul movement); and the Tea Party movement. And, GenY is making its own movement against budget cuts to higher education.

9/11, Deep State Violence and the Hope of Internet Politics by Prof. Peter Dale Scott

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( Note: This piece by Scott has been updated to include footnotes at globalresearch.ca )

9/11, Deep State Violence and the Hope of Internet Politics by Prof. Peter Dale Scott

Global Research, June 11, 2008

The Deep State and 9/11

The unthinkable – that elements inside the state would conspire with criminals to kill innocent civilians – has become not only thinkable but commonplace in the last century. A seminal example was in French Algeria, where dissident elements of the French armed forces, resisting General de Gaulle’s plans for Algerian independence, organized as the Secret Army Organization and bombed civilians indiscriminately, with targets including hospitals and schools. Critics like Alexander Litvinenko, who was subsequently murdered in London in November 2006, have charged that the 1999 bombings of apartment buildings around Moscow, attributed to Chechen separatists, were in fact the work of the Russian secret service (FSB).

Similar attacks in Turkey have given rise to the notion there of an extra-legal "deep state" – a combination of forces, ranging from former members of the CIA-organized Gladio organization, to "a vast matrix of security and intelligence officials, ultranationalist members of the Turkish underworld and renegade former members of the [Kurdish separatist] PKK." The deep state, financed in part by Turkey’s substantial heroin traffic, has been accused of killing thousands of civilians, in incidents such as the lethal bomb attack in November 2005 on a bookshop in Semdinli. This attack, initially attributed to the Kurdish separatist PKK, turned out to have been committed by members of Turkey's paramilitary police intelligence service, together with a former PKK member turned informer. On April 23, 2008, the former Interior Minister Mehmet Agar was ordered to stand trial for his role in this dirty war during the 1990s.