NORAD

June 1, 2001 Memo

Can anyone tell me where exactly on the June 1, 2001 memo of the Joint Chiefs it states that Dick Cheney is to be placed in charge of NORAD?

MP3 download: David Ray Griffin Shreds NORAD Tapes

Yesterday, August 30, 2006, on KPFA's "Guns and Butter" radio program, host Bonnie Faulkner featured a new interview with David Ray Griffin: THIS IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED LISTENING. The recent Vanity Fair piece and the NORAD tapes are thoroughly deconstructed and shown to be rife with anomalies;

The NORAD Audio Tapes: Real or Faked?

Interview with Dr. David Ray Griffin regarding his most recent article, "9/11 Live or Fabricated: Do the NORAD Tapes Verify the 9/11 Commission Report?" Griffin's article, written primarily in response to Vanity Fair Magazine's, "9/11 Live: The NORAD Tapes" by Michael Bronner in their September 2006 issue, deconstructs the preposterous argument that NORAD was not notified by the FAA of hijacked airliners until they had struck their targets or crashed, and that the only jets the military scrambled were in response to a flight that did not exist. Griffin takes a close look at NORAD's audio tapes, on whose authenticity these claims depend.

MP3 download - 10.2 MB

NORAD's Response On 9/11

I sent a letter.

Hi NORAD,

I was hoping you can help me out. It's hard to find any information on this particular subject. In the event of an air emergency, what is the average response time of an intercept?

Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Jon Gold

The response...

Sir: Unfortunately there are too many variables to give you an accurate answer. The bottom-line is we have alert aircraft at various locations throughout the U.S. (and Canada with NORAD) and it would just be a matter of minutes from the time they are notified until they where airborne. So then it depends on where our aircraft took off from and where is the "target" aircraft--you can look at our Air Force aircraft fact sheets on the F-15 and F-16 fighters (Canada uses mainly CFA-18 aircraft) to determine their speed and look up the speed of the target aircraft with a web search to roughly calculate the time and place the intercept would occur depending on the location of the aircraft. The fact sheets are located at this web site: http://www.af.mil/factsheets/

Here's a very rough example from a non-pilot (me): An F-15, with a top speed of 1,800 mph could intercept an aircraft 600 miles away flying parallel to where the fighter took off in 20+ minutes or so, now if the "target" aircraft is flying at 600 mph and heading toward the place where the fighter took off then the intercept would be at the 400 mile mark and would likely take only 13 minutes or so--theoretically, depending on winds and weather, etc...