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DOJ Confirms Previously-Denied File Said to Implicate US Officials in Nuclear Espionage by Erik Larson

In a March 12, 2012 FOIA appeal response, the US Dept. of Justice (DOJ) implicitly acknowledged the existence of FBI File 203A-WF-210023, which FBI whistleblower Sibel Edmonds has said contains evidence of top US officials’ complicity in the trafficking of nuclear secrets, arms and drugs, in addition to bribery, blackmail, money-laundering and obstruction of investigation into 9/11. In 2008, the Sunday Times of London reported that the FBI, in response to a different FOIA request, denied the existence of the file.

The January 20, 2008 report by the Sunday Times, FBI denies file exposing nuclear secrets theft, briefly summarized Edmonds’ allegations about the file in this way: “She says the FBI was investigating a Turkish and Israeli-run network that paid high-ranking American officials to steal nuclear weapons secrets. These were then sold on the international black market to countries such as Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.” According to an article by former CIA Officer Philip Giraldi, the file name 203A-WF-210023 indicates it’s an “FBI Washington Field Office, Counterintelligence Division, Turkish Unit File.”

When the Times asked Edmonds about FBI File 203A-WF-210023, she said, "The file refers to the counterintelligence programme that the Department of Justice has declared to be a state secret to protect sensitive diplomatic relations." The article goes on to say that, "the FBI responded to a [Liberty Coalition] freedom of information request for a file of exactly the same number by claiming that it did not exist. But The Sunday Times has obtained a document signed by an FBI official showing the existence of the file.” No other information was given regarding the latter document.

Letter to Editor: Whistleblower case merits investigation

http://www.cmonitor.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090925/OPINION/909250324/1029/OPINION03

September 25, 2009 - 12:00 am

I am alarmed about the detailed allegations that have now come to public light in the case of Sibel Edmonds, the former FBI language specialist who was fired after accusing a colleague of covering up illicit activity. The allegations, outlined by Edmonds in a recent interview in The American Conservative, concern a massive corruption scheme involving U.S. government employees, members of Congress and agents of foreign governments, primarily Turkey.

Taking bribes and receiving favors from foreign governments seeking to influence decisions on vital matters of U.S. national security constitutes the gravest possible breach of the public trust. If these allegations are true, and we now have very plausible evidence that they are, then they merit the highest possible level of public concern, and urgent congressional investigation and action.

Sibel Edmonds' Redacted IG Report Released by Luke Ryland

lots of links, see orig

http://letsibeledmondsspeak.blogspot.com/

Sibel Edmonds' Redacted IG Report Released

I've got a few items today.

Firstly, former FBI translator Sibel Edmonds and I were interviewed by Scott Horton for Antiwar Radio last week. The interview went live on Monday. From the blurb:
"Sibel Edmonds and Luke Ryland discuss the London Times series on her case and the international nuclear black-market network surrounding A.Q. Kahn, the U.S. government’s total clamp-down by gag orders even against Congress, the American foreign policy hypocrisy of demonizing certain nuclear ambitions and supporting others, the military-industrial-congressional complex revolving door, the bipartisan lack of enthusiasm in pursuing whistleblower cases, the movie about Sibel’s case “Kill The Messenger,” and how it only takes one congressman to call her to testify to blow the case wide open."
You can listen (50 mins) to it here, and read the transcript here. The youtube version is here

For the first time, the redacted version of the Department of Justice's Inspector General's report into Sibel's case has been released - parts 1, 2, & 3 (pdfs)