Pennsylvania

Earliest known video of Flight 93 crash in Shanksville, PA on 9/11

The earliest known video has surfaced showing the immediate aftermath of the crash of United Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pa.

Here’s the clip, from CNN:

In the modern world of viral crowdsourcing, video and photos of even the most mundane event are available, from every conceivable angle, with lightning speed, so it is remarkable that, ten years later, new video from 9/11 has just surfaced. On CNN Sunday night, anchor Susan Hendricks introduced a piece of video from a now-deceased witness who videotaped the aftermath of heroic Flight 93 from about 15 miles away. His family has apparently just made the video available now.

Contest: Submit Your Toughest Building 7 Question and We'll Ask It!

Ask the<br />
Candidate - Presented by Lehigh Valley 9/11 Truth

By Jeff Jacobucci/Join911Truth.com

Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania - Lehigh Valley 9/11 Truth announces, today, that it will be giving residents of the Lehigh Valley the opportunity to go straight to their Congressman with their toughest questions about the destruction of Building 7.

How was the building destroyed?  How was freefall possible?  How did nano-thermite get into the debris?  Who committed this horrible crime?  And, why?

It's been nine years.  We feel that your Congressman ought to be able to give you a straight answer by now on just, exactly, what the scoop is about Building 7.

The rules of the contest are:

Outreach at the Wilson Borough Firestation in Easton, Pennsylvania

Outreach at Wilson Borough Firehouse, Easton

By Jeff Jacobucci/Join911Truth.com

Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania - "It makes you think," said a local firefighter at the Wilson Borough Firehouse on Monday, September 13, after watching the 10-minute version of Richard Gage's Blueprint for Truth DVD with about five of his other fellow firemen on the big tv screen in the lounge area inside the firehouse.

"Lounge" is hardly a word that describes the occupation of these men: the alarm sounded twice during my short visit with them; once for a fire, and a second time for a personal health emergency.  The first alarm dispatched about four men; the second about two more, leaving about five or six to view the Blueprint DVD.

Just another day on the job in the life of the Easton firefighters, it would seem.

And, these men, as a group, were well aware of 9/11, and their Chief, Mike Collins, knew just how many firefighters lives had been lost on that day: 343 to be exact.

Inside a 9/11 'Truther' Convention - ABC News

Source: http://blogs.abcnews.com/nightlinedailyline/2010/03/inside-a-911-truther-convention-.html

Inside a 9/11 'Truther' Convention

March 08, 2010 6:30 PM

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Chris Bury and producer Katie Hinman did just that this weekend -- attending a convention in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, alongside hundreds who share a collective distrust of the official explanation for the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

As they will report tonight, the attendees come from several different viewpoints, knitted together in this "movement" largely online.

We talk to conference organizer Betsy Metz, who tells us there is "absolutely a cover-up," and the producers of "Loose Change" a conspiracy theorist film that is among the most downloaded videos in Google history.

Pennsylvania to cover cost for security at 9/11 site

Source: http://www.denverpost.com/headlines/ci_6124362

Pennsylvania to cover cost for security at 9/11 site

By Daniel Lovering The Associated Press

The Denver Post

Article Last Updated:06/13/2007 01:17:43 AM MDT

Pittsburgh - Pennsylvania will pay for security at the Flight 93 crash site to end a dispute over a donation box at the memorial to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the governor said Tuesday.

Landowner Mike Svonavec said he installed the box to cover security costs at the site near Shanksville. But the cash box angered victims' families, and the National Park Service covered it with a black plastic bag.

Gov. Ed Rendell announced a $120,000 grant to pay for security at the site for two years, saying the victims' families should not have to raise the money themselves.

"It also eliminates any need for donation boxes, which transformed this hallowed ground into something less dignified," Rendell said in a news release.