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Philadelphia Inquirer

Sept. 11 Lawsuit

Lots of html links in the article; follow the link to to the original for working links:

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/hot_topics/19374964.html

Posted on Thu, May. 29, 2008

Sept. 11 Lawsuit

The lawsuit

An epic lawsuit filed by Philadelphia firm Cozen O'Connor looks to place direct blame for the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and a host of individuals, banks and groups so that it can recover billions of dollars in damages.

The following excerpts from the lawsuit are in the form of .pdfs, and vary in length from 12 to 61 pages. There is some overlap, in instances where a section ended in the middle of the page; the excerpt that follows picks up on that same page.

1. The list of plaintiffs and defendants. Read the document

2. Background on the actions leading to the lawsuit, and beginning of the allegations against each defendant. Read the document

3. More background on the actions leading to the lawsuit. This section presents allegations against the defendant banks and other financial institutions. Read the document

A former al-Qaeda fighter accuses a Saudi charity (Saudi lawsuit)

Related to the Cozen 9/11 Saudi victim's family lawsuit:

http://www.philly.com/philly/business/20080531_A_former_al-Qaeda_fighter_accuses_a_Saudi_charity.html

Posted on Sat, May. 31, 2008

Special Report

A former al-Qaeda fighter accuses a Saudi charity

By Chris Mondics
INQUIRER STAFF WRITER

DOBOJ, Bosnia - For years, Saudi Arabia flatly denied it had provided money and logistical support for Islamist militant groups that attacked Western targets.

But that assertion is disputed by a former al-Qaeda commander who testified in a United Nations war-crimes trial that his unit was funded by the Saudi High Commission for Relief of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Ali Ahmed Ali Hamad, the former al-Qaeda fighter, gave the same account to The Inquirer in an interview in this struggling city in the central Balkans.

"Because it was the biggest charity, [the commission] helped the mujaheddin the most," Hamad said, adding that it had provided "everything a person needed to exist."