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28 Peer-Reviewed Journal Papers that Critically Analyze 9/11

Since the first peer-reviewed journal paper that critically examined the evidence of the events of September 11th, 2001, which was by physics professor Steven E. Jones entitled “What Accounts for the Molten Metal Observed on 9/11/2001?” in the Journal of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters in 2006, there have been several academics that worked very hard over the years to publish in mainstream journals despite the barriers. This is a major achievement for the 9/11 research community. The community is encouraged to read the following four recent papers, especially the conclusion of the doctoral dissertation at Oklahoma State University:

August 2017 | Conspiracy Theories and the Paranoid Style: Do Conspiracy Theories Posit Implausibly Vast and Evil Conspiracies?
Journal: Social Epistemology: A Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Policy (Taylor & Francis Online)
Author: Dr. Kurtis Hagen, PhD (Philosophy)
Link: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/FaiFjpuf75tJQWTkqTDi/full

June 2017 | Peer Review in Controversial Topics—A Case Study of 9/11
Journal: MDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)
Author: Dr. John D. Wyndham, PhD (Physics)

9/11 in the Academic Community - Documentary Preview

Coming this fall, “9/11 in the Academic Community,” a Winner of the University of Toronto Film Festival, is a unique film that documents academia's treatment of critical perspectives on 9/11 by exploring the taboo that shields the American government's narrative from scholarly examination. Through a powerful reflection on intellectual courage and the purpose of academia, the film aims at changing intellectual discourse on 9/11 and the War on Terror.

All efforts are being made to make this film available by this October. Please widely distribute the following video preview: Youtube Video Preview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFzVKDdCa6s

Chronicle of Higher Education covers Prof. Woodward

Another Scholar Under Fire for 9/11 Views

The University of New Hampshire is refusing to fire a tenured professor whose views on 9/11 have led many politicians in the state to demand his dismissal.

William Woodward, a professor of psychology, is among those academics who believe that U.S. leaders have lied about what they know about 9/11, and were involved in a conspiracy that led to the massive deaths on that day, setting the stage for the war with Iraq. The Union Leader, a New Hampshire newspaper, reported on Woodward’s views on Sunday, and quoted him (accurately, he says) saying that he includes his views in some class sessions.

The newspaper then interviewed a who’s who of New Hampshire Republican politicians calling for the university to fire Woodward. U.S. Sen. Judd Gregg is quoted as saying that “there are limitations to academic freedom and freedom of speech” and that “it is inappropriate for someone at a public university which is supported with taxpayer dollars to take positions that are generally an affront to the sensibility of most all Americans.”

State legislators chimed in, demanding Woodward’s dismissal and threatening to consider the issue when they next review the university’s budget. In some respects, the political reactions mirror those in Wisconsin, where lawmakers lined up to urge the University of Wisconsin at Madison to fire Kevin Barrett, who shared Woodward’s views and is an adjunct teaching in the fall semester. The university is letting Barrett’s course go ahead, although as a non-tenured adjunct, he has no assurance of work after this semester.