Seismic Data

Urban Earthquakes, Nuclear Bombs And 9/11: New York Seismologist Honored For Work Local And Global

11 Oct 2008
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Won-Young Kim, a senior scientist at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has won the Jesuit Seismological Association Award from the Seismological Society of America for his work on wide-ranging questions both local and global. Among other things, he has assessed earthquake hazards in New York City and beyond; developed methods of monitoring nuclear-bomb tests; and clarified the sequence of events during the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Flight 93 Sonic Boom?

Just wanted to get some thoughts about this writeup:

 

Seismic Event: The Final Moments of Flight 93

FLIGHT 93'S SMOKING GUN

an investigative article by Robb Magley
(Mr. Magley is not affiliated with Flight93Crash.com but has allowed my to reproduce his article here)

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Truth, mused Tolstoy, is like gold, in that it is obtained by washing away from it all that is not gold.

Sadly, there seems to be less gold in the official story of United Airlines Flight 93 than we would like to think.

The relatively obscure field which considers the seismology of supersonic aircraft has produced something of a smoking gun in the mystery surrounding Flight 93's final moments. Evidence from the seismic record indicates there was at least one supersonic warplane within striking distance of Flight 93 on the fateful morning of September 11, 2001. A signal exhibiting the seismic signature characteristic of a passing sonic boom was recorded at 9:22 A.M. local time by an earthquake monitoring station in southern Pennsylvania. This station is just 60 miles from the abandoned stripmine in Somerset County where the Boeing 757-200 hit the earth at 10:06.