Tamara Lush

The Dallas Observer news story about "North Texans for 9/11 Truth"

NEWS
North Texans For 9/11 Truth: Still Running Around in "Rabbit Hole" After All These Years
By Anna Merlan Wed., Sep. 7 2011 at 9:30 AM

http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/unfairpark/2011/09/911_truth_movement_in_north_te.php

The North Texans for 9/11 Truth-ers riding in the 2009 MLK Day Parade down Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

With the decade anniversary of 9/11 almost here, there's been a run of stories in every media outlet, major and minor, about both the September 11 attacks and the decade that followed. A few of those pieces, including a recent Associated Press report ( http://www.deseretnews.com/article/700176620/From-JFK-killing-to-Sept-11-conspiracy-theories-thrive.html ) making the rounds, have focused on September 11th conspiracy theories. You know the ones: 9/11 was an inside job, the towers were brought down with controlled demolitions, the government knew about the attacks ahead of time -- there are different permutations, but all the theories basically center around the belief that the "official" version of what happened, as told in the 9/11 Commission Report and mostly echoed by the reporting of the country's journalists, is a lie.

From JFK to Sept. 11, conspiracy theories thrive - Associated Press

By TAMARA LUSH Associated Press - August 11, 2011 (AP)

Conspiracy theories come with the territory here. And at Barbec's Restaurant on the other side of this sprawling city, six men sit on a covered porch and convene a meeting of the North Texans for 9/11 Truth group and talk about the government's lies about 9/11.

The group has 50 active members; 200 on the mailing list. And they number among many thousands who, after years of investigations, don't believe the official version of how the World Trade Center collapsed, who was responsible or what the government knew and when.

Politics doesn't have anything to do with it; two were once staunch, Bush-voting conservatives; two are progressives and two weren't even interested in current events until after the 2001 attacks.

"Before 9/11, I was a working class person, going through life, pretty much accepting everything given and told to me," said Bryan Black, a 50-year-old carpenter from Commerce, Texas, "I'm starting to see things. I'm more open to skeptical conversation."