Touching History

Midwest Pilot Almost Hit Plane On 9/11 (Touching History)

Wait; are they suuurre that wasn't a missile surrounded by a hologram? Well, it's just establishment propaganda anyway; i do hope someone or many are checking it for new info, contradictions, lies, distortions, slip-ups and the like, i don't have the time (or the brains)

http://www.todaystmj4.com/news/local/21411024.html

Midwest Pilot Almost Hit Plane On 9/11
Associated Press

MILWAUKEE - Midwest Airlines pilot Gerald Earwood was flying about 100 miles west of New York when he first noticed what seemed like wisps of smoke coming off the World Trade Center.

Roughly 15 minutes later, Earwood and co-pilot Eric Fjelstad were frantically maneuvering their DC-9 jet to avoid colliding with United Airlines Flight 175, the second airplane to hit the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. Their work, following orders from air traffic controllers, saved the lives of about 30 passengers and five crew members of Midwest Flight 7.

A minute or so later, United 175 -- which also came close to colliding with other planes that morning -- struck the south tower of the World Trade Center.

Pilot Adds Perspective To Sept. 11 Attacks: "Touching History"

"In some cases, the facts published in this book, as told to her in interviews with airmen and airline pilots who were involved, differ markedly from the account in The 9/11 Commission Report," retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Larry Arnold, the commander of 1st Air Force in Panama City on Sept. 11, said in "Touching History."
"After reading this book, you decide," Arnold wrote."

Who Is? Larry Arnold
http://visibility911.com/jongold/?p=159

Pilot Adds Perspective To Sept. 11 Attacks

By TED JACKOVICS
The Tampa Tribune
Published: June 8, 2008

Updated:

"Touching History: The Untold Story of the Drama That Unfolded in the Skies Over America on 9/11," by Lynn Spencer (Free Press, $26)

The late U.S. Army Col. Milton "Bud" Halsey once shared his thoughts on how Cold War air defense units would have responded in an attack on the United States.
"You never know how individuals will react in combat," said Halsey, a Bronze and Silver Star-decorated veteran of two wars. "You have to wait until they take some hits. You won't know how well they will perform until you learn how they respond to casualties."