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Trial Scheduled Over Missing Surveillance Tapes of Oklahoma City Bombing

Friday, July 25, 2014
Trial Scheduled Over Missing Surveillance Tapes of Oklahoma City Bombing
Fox 13

"Jesse Trentadue is suing the CIA and FBI, demanding the agencies release surveillance video of the bombing that killed 168. But the federal government claims the tapes don’t exist anymore." ...

"The trial begins Monday and is expected to wrap up Wednesday. It is anticipated that the federal judge handling the case will issue a ruling in writing at a later date."

VIDEO HERE:

http://player.ooyala.com/iframe.html#pbid=3ce6404476914e86994d87aac3e4391b&ec=l3d3Y2bzpO8DqF0lTx_e6Hytn0REVDUC&docUrl=http...

Full lawsuit can be read here:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/234908837/Trentadue-FOIA-lawsuit-over-OKC-bombing-videotape
http://fox13now.com/2014/07/23/oklahoma-city-bombing-video-trial-to-begin-next-week-in-utah/

Five years late already

Atrocious record keeping

Currently, the FBI's official record keeping system is paper-based and decentralized. The FBI has several electronic record keeping systems, but none of these systems meet the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) standards of a system of records. Only the costly and inefficient paper-based system has been approved by NARA. Thus, the FBI must maintain tens of millions of paper files. These papers are maintained and stored at 265 different locations including FBI Headquarters, field offices, large resident agencies, some Legal Attaché offices, Investigative Technology Centers, and various other off-site locations. These files consist of open, active investigative and administrative files, as well as closed, inactive files. Few of the existing records repositories comply with the NARA standards for records storage facilities, which become mandatory on October 1, 2009.

http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/toolkit/fbi/rma-current-state.html

deliberate

The apparent incompetence in record keeping is deliberate obfuscation, IMHO.

Of course, If I'm mistaken, them I'm OK with firing everyone FOR incompetence.

A Noble Lie...

Spooky

(and tedious) how much this resembles issues around 9/11.. I wasn't aware of the degree of citizen organization on this.

Man seeks video of 1995 Oklahoma City bombing

http://news.yahoo.com/man-seeks-video-1995-oklahoma-city-bombing-150445326.html

Man seeks video of 1995 Oklahoma City bombing
Associated Press
By TIM TALLEY and BRADY McCOMBS 7 hours ago

EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT - Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue holds a photograph of his holds a photograph of his dead brother showing his bruises and injuries during an interview Wednesday, July 16, 2014, in Salt Lake City. Trentadue's quest to explain his brother’s mysterious jail cell death has rekindled long-dormant questions about whether others were involved in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Trentadue's Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the federal government goes to trial Monday, July 28, 2014, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — One man's quest to explain his brother's mysterious jail cell death 19 years ago has rekindled long-dormant questions about whether others were involved in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

What some consider a far-flung conspiracy theory will be at the forefront during a trial set to begin Monday in Salt Lake City. The Freedom of Information Act lawsuit was brought by Salt Lake City attorney Jesse Trentadue against the FBI. He says the agency won't release security camera videos that show a second person was with Timothy McVeigh when he parked a truck outside the Oklahoma City federal building and detonated a bomb, killing 168 people. The government claims McVeigh was alone.

Unsatisfied by the FBI's previous explanations, U.S. District Judge Clark Waddoups has ordered the agency to explain why it can't find videos from the bombing that are mentioned in evidence logs, citing the public importance of the tapes.

Trentadue believes the presence of a second suspect in the truck explains why his brother, Kenneth Trentadue, was flown to Oklahoma several months after the bombing, where he died in a federal holding cell in what was labeled a suicide. His brother bore a striking resemblance to the police sketch that officials sent out after the bombing based on witness descriptions of the enigmatic suspect "John Doe No. 2," who was the same height, build and complexion. The suspect was never identified.

"I did not start out to solve the Oklahoma City bombing, I started out for justice for my brother's murder," Jesse Trentadue said. "But along the way, every path I took, every lead I got, took me to the bombing."

The FBI says it can't find anything to suggest the videos exist, and says it would be "unreasonably burdensome" to do a search that would take a single staff person more than 18 months to conduct.

Jesse Trentadue's belief that the tapes exists stems from a Secret Service document written shortly after the bombing that describes security video footage of the attack that shows suspects — in plural — exiting the truck three minutes before it went off.

A Secret Service agent testified in 2004 that the log does, in fact, exist but that the government knows of no videotape. The log that the information was pulled from contained reports that were never verified, said Stacy A. Bauerschmidt, then-assistant to the special agent in charge of the agency's intelligence division.

Several investigators and prosecutors who worked the case told The Associated Press in 2004 they had never seen video footage like that described in the Secret Service log.

The FBI has released 30 video recordings to Trentadue from downtown Oklahoma City, but those recordings don't show the explosion or McVeigh's arrival in a rental truck.

If he wins at trial, Trentadue hopes to be able to search for the tapes himself rather than having to accept the FBI's answer that they don't exist.

Kathy Sanders and Jannie Coverdale, who both lost grandchildren in the bombing, are grateful for Trentadue's pursuit of the case. Sanders said she's been waiting 19 years to see the tapes.

"It is worth pursuing," Coverdale said. "I know there was somebody else. I have never stopped asking questions."

But former Oklahoma Rep. Susan Winchester, whose sister, Dr. Margaret "Peggy" Clark, was killed in the bombing, said she is satisfied that officials have identified everyone responsible for the bombing.

"I was very comfortable with the decisions that came out of the federal and state trials," Winchester said. "I have reached that point in my life where I can continue."

Jesse Trentadue's mission began four months after the bombing when his brother died at the U.S. Bureau of Prisons' Federal Transfer Center in Oklahoma City. Kenneth Trentadue, 44, a convicted bank robber and construction worker, was brought there after being picked up for probation violations while coming back to the U.S. at the Mexican border, Jesse Trentadue said.
View gallery
Jannie Coverdale leans on the chair of one of her grandchildren …
Jannie Coverdale leans on the chair of one of her grandchildren in the Field of Chairs at the Oklaho …

His death was officially labeled a suicide. But his body had 41 wounds and bruises that his brother believes were the result of a beating. In 2008, a federal judge awarded the family $1.1 million in damages for extreme emotional distress in the government's handling of the death, but the amount was reduced to $900,000 after an appeal.

Jesse Trentadue's best guess about the motive is that his brother died in an interrogation gone wrong by investigators demanding information Kenneth Trentadue didn't have.

Jesse Trentadue filed the Freedom of Information Act lawsuit in 2008.

Going toe-to-toe with the federal government has come at a personal price for Jesse Trentadue, 67, who says he's lost time with his children and wife that he can't recover.

But he has no regrets, fueled by his love for his brother. Just three years apart, the two shared a bed, hunted coons together and played on the same sports teams growing up in a coal camp in West Virginia.

Their paths diverged as adults — Jesse becoming an attorney while Kenneth fell into drugs and crime — but the brotherly bond never broke. Before his death, Kenneth Trentadue had overcome his heroin addiction and had a newborn baby at home in San Diego, Jesse Trentadue said. The brothers spoke by phone from jail the night before his death, with the two discussing how he would soon be out.

"What I learned growing up in the coal fields is that you fight even when you know you can't win," he said. "Because you have to make a stand on some things. Justice for my brother is certainly one of them."

FBI to probe tampering claims in OKC bombing records case

(FBI investigates self as usual)

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58334561-78/fbi-matthews-trentadue-bombing.html.csp

John Matthews has the ball.