Pipeline

What do Afghanistan, Enron, 9-11, Anthrax and Iraq have in common?

News Stories You May Have Missed - by John Heartson

Q. What do Afghanistan, Enron, 9-11, Anthrax and Iraq have in common?

A. Lots of Lies and Coverups.

I have spent over 500 hours compiling information from news articles, government documents, and energy trade journals. These papers uncover an energy project that got out of hand. The news articles are sourced, (the headlines I added).

The short story. The largest oil and gas reserves are in Central Asia but are land locked. The US covertly supported and courted the Taliban to get a huge pipeline project through Afghanistan.. Clinton backed out after al-Qaeda terrorist attacks. Bush resumed negotiations, then threatened the Taliban with military action and planned an invasion before 9-11 occurred. Many believe that 9-11 was allowed to happen so no one would question the invasion of Afghanistan and the building of bases. Iraq was planned next. Letting 9-11 happen has been claimed by many people within the FBI and the administration. The pre-planned invasion of Afghansitan and Iraq are not theories, they are facts.

Some News You May Have Missed:

Turkmen natural gas pipeline Tapi to cross Afghanistan

The agreement was concluded in the Turkmen capital Ashgabat 

 Indian energy minister Murli Deora, Pakistani<br />
President Asif Ali Zardari, Turkmen President Kurbanguly Berdymukhamedov<br />
and Afghan President Hamid Karzai shakes hands in Ashgabat,<br />
Turkmenistan, 11 December

A deal has been struck on building a 1,700km (1,050m) pipeline to carry Turkmen natural gas across Afghanistan to Pakistan and India.

The Tapi project aims to feed energy-deprived South Asian markets and transit fees may benefit Afghanistan.
But details about security and funding were not addressed in the framework agreement reached by the four states.
The pipeline will have to cross Taliban-controlled regions and Pakistan's troubled border region.
Turkmenistan has previously costed the project at $3.3bn (£2.1bn, 2.5bn euros) although other estimates are as high as $10bn.
Tapi, a project which dates back to the mid-1990s, is backed by the Asian Development Bank (ADB).
The US has also encouraged the project as an alternative to a proposed Iranian pipeline to India and Pakistan.

BBC map

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11977744