2001 anthrax attacks

Vital Unresolved Anthrax Questions and ABC News

Vital Unresolved Anthrax Questions and ABC News

by Glenn Greenwald

The FBI’s lead suspect in the September, 2001 anthrax attacks — Bruce E. Ivins — died Tuesday night, apparently by suicide, just as the Justice Department was about to charge him with responsibility for the attacks. For the last 18 years, Ivins was a top anthrax researcher at the U.S. Government’s biological weapons research laboratories at Ft. Detrick, Maryland, where he was one of the most elite government anthrax scientists on the research team at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID).

Anthrax scientist commits suicide as FBI closes in

Anthrax scientist commits suicide as FBI closes in

By LARA JAKES JORDAN and DAVID DISHNEAU – Friday August 1, 2008

WASHINGTON (AP) — A top U.S. biodefense researcher apparently committed suicide just as the Justice Department was about to file criminal charges against him in the anthrax mailings that traumatized the nation in the weeks following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, according to a published report.

The scientist, Bruce E. Ivins, 62, who worked for the past 18 years at the government's biodefense labs at Fort Detrick, Md., had been told about the impending prosecution, the Los Angeles Times reported for Friday editions. The laboratory has been at the center of the FBI's investigation of the anthrax attacks, which killed five people.

Ivins died Tuesday at Frederick Memorial Hospital in Maryland. The Times, quoting an unidentified colleague, said the scientist had taken a massive dose of a prescription Tylenol mixed with codeine.

FBI Focusing on 'About Four' Suspects in 2001 Anthrax Attacks

FBI Focusing on 'About Four' Suspects in 2001 Anthrax Attacks

Friday, March 28, 2008

By Catherine Herridge and Ian McCaleb

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,342852,00.html

WASHINGTON — The FBI has narrowed its focus to "about four" suspects in the 6 1/2-year investigation of the deadly anthrax attacks of 2001, and at least three of those suspects are linked to the Army’s bioweapons research facility at Fort Detrick in Maryland, FOX News has learned.

Among the pool of suspects are three scientists — a former deputy commander, a leading anthrax scientist and a microbiologist — linked to the research facility, known as USAMRIID.

The FBI has collected writing samples from the three scientists in an effort to match them to the writer of anthrax-laced letters that were mailed to two U.S. senators and at least two news outlets in the fall of 2001, a law enforcement source confirmed.

The anthrax attacks began shortly after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, further alarming a nation already reeling from the deaths of 3,000 Americans. Five people were killed and more than a dozen others were infected by the deadly spores in the fall of 2001.

Judge threatens contempt in anthrax case

I read this in the Weekend Wall St Journal. I searched their website and couldn't locate the article, but did google and find the same story here:
http://www.mercurynews.com/politics/ci_8304102
If this has already been posted on the blog or is not of any real interest, I apologize.
I thought it was interesting that this important piece of the puzzle is resurfacing in the courts.