zero dark thirty

What Zero Dark Thirty gets wrong about Guantánamo lawyers

"In the continuing controversy over the treatment of torture in Zero Dark Thirty, a crucial scene has been overlooked – one that makes the film’s point of view clear, even if it’s less attention-grabbing than images of waterboarding. The scene comes late in the movie, after the CIA has surmised that Osama bin Laden is possibly hiding in Abbottabad, Pakistan. One government official wonders aloud whether a Guantánamo detainee might be able to confirm that location, to which a CIA operative replies, “Who the hell am I supposed to ask, some guy in Gitmo who’s all lawyered up?” He explains that any lawyer will simply tip off al-Qaeda.

Defense lawyers are used to being portrayed in the media as morally questionable hired guns, while their police and prosecutorial counterparts play committed heroes who avenge victims and put the bad guys away. Even in the left-leaning HBO series The Wire, which broke the mold of the police procedural, the main defense attorney unscrupulously helps gangsters hide criminal activity, while the head prosecutor is accurately described on Wikipedia as one of the show’s “most morally upright figures.”

Zero Dark Thirty Review-Analysis; Eleven Instances of Disinformation

There will always be questions about when Osama Bin Laden was killed and happened to his body. At Cabal Times, we have posited a reasonable theory that Osama was killed in December 2001 by a Pakistani, Omar Saeed Shaikh.

Hollywood coming to rescue of the official narrative in Zero Dark Thirty (released 19th December 2012) only hints that the cover-up is crumbling, and a face lift was required. For the sceptic, Zero Dark Thirty is mandatory viewing. Because a critical analysis reveals the cracks and fault lines in the official narrative that the film is so desperately trying to hide. Zero Dark Thirty goes beyond hiding these cracks, and even tries to cover-up some other suspicious events, completely unrelated to the hunt for Osama.

http://www.cabaltimes.com/2013/01/11/zero-dark-thirty/