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Evidence grows that 9/11 first-responders got cancer after working at Ground Zero

http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/evidence-mounting-9-11-first-responders-cancer-working-ground-zero-article-1.1024717
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Published: Tuesday, February 21, 2012, 4:00 AM
WARGA, CRAIG/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Joseph Zadroga fought for the bill that bears his son’s name. But will it cover first responders who fell ill with cancer?

The director of Mount Sinai Medical Center’s World Trade Center health program is preparing to publish a study that will show elevated risks of cancer among 9/11 rescue and recovery workers.

A leading authority on the illnesses suffered by Ground Zero responders, Dr. Philip Landrigan says that an analysis of 20,000 medical case histories revealed an incidence of cancer that is 14% higher than expected for a population of the same profile. The most common elevations were in prostate, thyroid and blood cancers.

Landrigan’s findings add to the evidence that the toll from service on or around The Pile, bad as that toll has been, will significantly worsen with time. Research by fire department doctors previously had found a 19% higher cancer rate among FDNY members who’d been at Ground Zero than among those who hadn’t.

It has been well-established that exposure to airborne toxins in the smoke and dust that shrouded Ground Zero produced respiratory, heart and gastrointestinal damage. And medical experts have feared from the start that cancers, which develop slowly, would emerge.

New York State legislation would force the NYPD to release names of all cops who worked at Ground Zero

NY State legislation would force the NYPD to release names of all cops who worked at Ground Zero to cancer researchers
Mount Sinai Medical Center scientists have asked for the information

By Kenneth+Lovett+/+NEW+YORK+DAILY+NEWS
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

ALBANY — The NYPD would be required to provide the list of cops who worked at Ground Zero to cancer researchers under legislation being drafted in the Legislature.

The measure was requested by the police officers union, which says the studies could help secure needed federal health money for ailing cops.

Scientists at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Manhattan have asked for the full roster of officers who served at Ground Zero, but the NYPD’s surgeon refused, citing privacy concerns.

Assemblyman Micah Kellner (D-Manhattan) and state Sen. Diane Savino (D-S.I.) ripped the decision and promised to introduce a bill as soon as next week compelling the NYPD to comply with the request.

“These were the heroes of 9/11, and they deserve the best health care possible,” Kellner said. “If there is a higher rate of cancer, we need to find that out through the best study possible, and that means releasing this list.”

9/11 cops’ cancer woe Average age just 44: PBA

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/cops_cancer_woe_Mv6FHbnSzyAyIYtlqNcHkK#ixzz1lbq9e2Z8

9/11 cops’ cancer woe
Average age just 44: PBA
By SALLY GOLDENBERG
Last Updated: 12:57 PM, February 6, 2012
Posted: 1:12 AM, February 6, 2012

More Print
EXCLUSIVE
A startling number of healthy, young cops who responded to the 9/11 attacks have since been diagnosed with cancer, according to new data obtained by The Post.
The statistics — which show nearly a tripling in the number of cops applying for cancer-related disability pensions post-9/11 — are the first of their kind to become public and confirm the fears of at least 12,000 police officers who toiled amid the rubble at the toxic World Trade Center site.
There are 297 cops who have been diagnosed with cancer since working at Ground Zero — and the average age is a shocking 44 at the time of diagnosis, according to the data from the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association.

Nearly 300 NYC Cops Diagnosed with Cancer Since 9/11

Fox News Latino

A startling number of healthy, young New York City cops who responded to the 9/11 terror attacks have since been diagnosed with cancer, according to data obtained by the New York Post.
The statistics, which show nearly a tripling in the number of cops applying for cancer-related disability pensions post-9/11, are the first of their kind to become public and confirm the fears of at least 12,000 police officers who toiled amid the rubble at the toxic World Trade Center site.
There are 297 cops who were diagnosed with cancer after working at Ground Zero -- and the average age was a shocking 44 at the time of diagnosis, according to the data from the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association (PBA

Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/health/2012/02/06/nearly-300-nyc-cops-diagnosed-with-cancer-since-11/#ixzz1lp5JXJaT

September 11th, 2001: The Enduring Health Legacy

http://www.mesothelioma.com/blog/authors/brian/september-11th-2001-the-enduring-health-legacy.htm
by Brian Turner
September 9th, 2011

Surely 9/11 touched each and every American significantly. It was the end of American innocence, sending a powerful message about our place in the world. Today, almost without exception, each of us can say that because of that bright September morning, we have been changed for life. Mothers were left without sons; brothers without brothers, and friends were taken from friends by this senseless act of violence. Unfortunately, the ultimate legacy of 9/11 many still bear as they deal with the long-lasting health effects associated these terrorist attacks.

Some have been left with the psychological trauma from that day, while others, including first responders and other rescue workers present that day must now confront respiratory conditions from the non-infamous “World Trade Center dust” that blanketed much of lower Manhattan that day. Ten years later, we still grapple with the realities of this dust and its devastating effects. What we won’t know for many years is the true, enduring effect of this dust. But we do know, and what will become clear as we explore this topic, is that the effects of the 9/11 on our health will continue to haunt us for years to come.

Should 9/11 First Responders Bill be extended beyond 2016?

Just this past December, the “9/11 First Responders Bill” was finally pushed through in Congress. The bill will look to provide medical care and monitoring for those who worked on ground zero and those who were living and working nearby the attacks. President Obama claimed it to be a great day by claiming “I believe this is a critical step for those who continue to bear the physical scars of those attacks.” Certainly getting the bill through is a huge step for those affected in or around ground zero. Even with this first step being taken, there are still some qualifications that could possibly be improved to help the bill cover the needs for those affected for the future.

9/11 Responder Buried After Battle With Cancer

Source: http://www.wnbc.com/news/14747179/detail.html

9/11 Responder Buried After Battle With Cancer

POSTED: 4:10 pm EST December 1, 2007
UPDATED: 6:40 pm EST December 1, 2007

NEW YORK -- An emergency medical service lieutenant with the New York Fire Department was laid to rest Saturday, and his colleagues say his death stems from toxic dust he inhaled at the World Trade Center site.

Lt. Brian Ellicott arrived at the World Trade Center site on the night of September 11th, 2001, and logged more than 100 hours working to clear the site and search for survivors, the Uniformed EMS Officers Union said.

Ellicott, 45, died Tuesday at Staten Island University Hospital after a three-month battle with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, officials said.

He left behind a wife and two kids.

Colleagues said the city has denied requests to classify Ellicott's death as in the line of duty, which would increase the benefits his family would receive.

The FDNY said it will do everything it can to support his family's application for benefits from the state Workers' Compensation Board.

Colleagues also want Ellicott listed as a casualty of 9/11.

Devoted N.Y. 9/11 responder dies after battle with cancer

Source: http://www.firerescue1.com/fire-ems/articles/320277/

11/30/2007

Devoted N.Y. 9/11 responder dies after battle with cancer

EMS lieutenant spent 100 hours on 'The Pile' killed by cancer at 45

By Tevah Platt

Staten Island Advance

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — As an EMS worker, Lt. Brian Ellicott was best at comforting his patients: "When you're better, you'll go out dancing," he used to tell them, distracting them from their pain. Lt. Ellicott, described as a big, "teddy bear" of a guy and a father of two, did that most every day.

Sept. 11, 2001, was different; there were few injuries to dress, just toil to be done in the dust.

Lt. Ellicott spent months working in "The Pile" at Ground Zero, toiling for 100 hours in the first two weeks after the terrorist attacks, according to the Uniformed EMS Officers Union.

His partner said he'd spent those hours facing the fact that "you never know when your time is going to come."

Lt. Ellicott didn't know that his own life span may have been refigured in those first 100 hours of labor.

FDNY Thyroid Cancer Shock

FDNY Thyroid Cancer Shock
Source: NY Post

By GINGER ADAMS OTIS and SUSAN EDELMAN

July 8, 2007 -- An alarming number of FDNY firefighters are battling a rare cancer that typically targets women, The Post has learned.

At least eight firefighters have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer over the past five years. Another five have undergone partial or full thyroidectomies after their doctors discovered abnormal cell growth that could lead to cancer around the glands.

The cluster has sprung up among those who responded to the World Trade Center on 9/11 or helped in recovery and cleanup afterward, firefighters said.

The relatively rare illness is known to affect women at three times the rate it hits males. The FDNY cases involve only men.

The National Cancer Institute put the incidence rate at 4.3 per 100,000 men - much lower than the eight cases among approximately 11,000 firefighters on the FDNY force on 9/11.